Monday, July 13, 2020

Review: Killing Harry Bones by Jonathan Harries




Genre: Adventure/Men’s Fiction/Dark Comedy

Description:

“In his first novel, Jonathan Harries flips the script and creates a world where the poachers are afraid of the animals—and then things really start to get weird.

Someone is slaughtering big-game hunters in Africa. And the deaths are particularly gruesome.

At the same time in Chicago, a disheveled and depressed Roger Storm, recently relieved of his duties as an ad exec, is also contemplating murder—that of his ex-boss, the despicable Harry Bones.

Then in what seems like a bizarre coincidence, Roger bumps into his supposedly dead childhood friend, the notorious arms dealer Freddy Blank, at a restaurant in Paris. Freddy and his ravishing partner, ex-Mossad agent Conchita Palomino, convince Roger to join them in a harebrained scheme to save Africa's wildlife and displaced people from a sinister global organization. In return Freddy promises to take care of Harry Bones.

Kicking, pleading, and dodging savage mercenaries while lusting after the voluptuous Conchita, a terrified Roger is hauled from Paris and London to the wilds of Ethiopia's Omo Valley, where under the darkest sky he has ever seen, an epic showdown takes place.”

Author:

Jonathan Harries, “grew up in Namibia, an extraordinarily beautiful and wild country where the desert meets the sea, with not a blade of grass in between. In my early teens we moved to South Africa where, after completing the perfunctory exercises necessary for entering adulthood, I began a career in advertising. While my love and fascination with wildlife began in Namibia, it grew into a passion in South Africa, and I spent every chance I got going to Botswana and other places where you could--and luckily still can--see animals in their natural habitat…

Since retiring, I've developed my passion for writing and storytelling into a second career--in fact, it is more of a vocation… The profits from all sales of my books are donated to animal charities. I hope they give you a laugh at the same time that they bring some awareness to the horrors of poaching and animal trafficking.”

You can see all of Mr. Harries books on his Amazon Author Page.

Appraisal:

First, I have a small disclaimer, I do not fit the demographic for this book so my opinion may slip through. However, it is only my opinion. I also confess I picked this book up because of the cover. I understand that is a big “No, no.” I expected something along the lines of Monty Python, I was mistaken…

Roger Storm’s life is in the dumps, he’s been let go from his job as a top ad-executive. He’s depressed and drinking himself into a stupor. When in a bar he spots a childhood friend who supposedly died years ago. Freddy Blank tries to recruit Roger into his campaign to save Africa’s wildlife. But he’s real sketchy about what he wants Roger to do or what part he will be able to play in Freddy’s scheme. Roger is a whiny nerd and Freddy is a masterful manipulator. Roger follows him around because Freddy’s business partner is a beautiful woman named Conchita.

The plot moves at a believable pace, until Roger reminisces about the trouble he and Freddy got into at school and growing up through the years. These steps back in time help us understand Freddy’s character. Of course there is an arch villain out to stop Freddy’s plan because he is making lots on money taking big game hunters on safaris to get trophies mounted on their walls.

What we have here are master conmen conning other conmen. There is espionage, double agents, and mercenaries working for the highest bidder. This is a real man’s man book full of alpha males and poor Roger is right in the middle of it all. His life will never be the same.

If you are a manly man who loves adventure and dark humor, you will probably love this book. The bonus is Killing Harry Bones is free, and if you enjoy it the other two books of this trilogy are waiting for you to pick them up. So, just go for it!

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

Killing Harry Bones is book 1 of Mr. Harries, The Roger Storm Books. I will warn you that there are lots of strong adult language. But, if you are a manly man you can handle that, right?

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues.

Rating: **** Four Stars

Reviewed by: ?wazithinkin

Approximate word count: 70-75,000 words

Friday, July 10, 2020

Review: Saturday Morning Tea by Tony Bridwell



Genre: Business Fiction

Description:

“Leah, the newly promoted manager at Blaise International, faces a common challenge: how to turn slow sales and uninterested employees into a booming enterprise. Uniting her team and avoiding employee layoffs seem impossible. Until she meets the Professor, Their weekly lessons on the power of story help Leah turn her employees and leadership team from unmotivated individuals into a community with a common goal. Alongside Leah, learn the three ways to experience story and how to identify a misaligned story. The Professor teaches that the way we present ourselves through verbal and nonverbal cues — employee recognition, team meeting behaviors, and identifying employee burnout — impacts not only our own path, but also the paths of others. Saturday Morning Tea is a powerful tale of leadership and ambition that proves how story has the power to change everything.”

Author:

“As an author, international speaker, consultant and coach, Tony Bridwell has been making a difference at some of the world’s largest organizations for the past 20 years. He is the former Chief People Officer of Brinker International and a past partner with global consulting firm, Partners In Leadership. Currently, Tony is the Chief People Officer for Ryan, LLC, the global leader in Tax Consulting.”

Appraisal:

This was described as business fiction. I wasn’t sure exactly what to expect, but after reading it think that’s a fair label, although depending on the picture that label paints for you it may or may not be exactly what you expect. Leah, a newly-minted manager meets “the Professor” at a local tea spot one Saturday morning. They get talking about Leah’s difficulties and the Professor lends his advice. This turns into a regular Saturday get together with the chronicling of what they discuss being the first part of each section in the book. Their discussion is a fairly realistic telling of what you might expect to hear from an intelligent up-and-coming, yet inexperienced manager and her mentor. Definitely fiction and definitely discussing business. The style is reminiscent of what fables and other stories that mentors and other more experienced people have used for thousands of years to illustrate points as they educate those who can benefit from their knowledge and experience. It isn’t fiction in the sense of entertaining like a good novel or short story, but by presenting the information as a story it makes it easier to take in and digest. At the end of each section the lessons you hopefully are coming away with are laid out much more explicitly, in my opinion to review the first time around and for easy reference down the road.

This is one of a series Bridwell has and continues to write.  I think this particular volume is especially interesting because I think he makes a good case for his approach to teaching, using stories, and how that approach can help in managing and mentoring others. Well done with an excellent lesson.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 13-14,000 words

Wednesday, July 8, 2020

Reprise Review: Wee Danny by Gerard Brennan



Genre: Crime Fiction

Description:

Danny Gibson is in a home for young offenders, in for a stretch after previous bad behavior. He has to prove to his teachers and psychologist that he’s a reformed character before he can be released. But that’s difficult after a lifetime of running wild on the streets of Belfast and when his fellow ‘inmates’ are trying to get him in trouble. Danny knows only one way to act, until he meets Conan that is.

Author:

Gerard Brennan lives in Northern Ireland with his family and recently completed an MA in creative writing at Belfast University. Gerard has previously published several other works including the novel, Wee Rockets, a novella, The Point, several short story collections and contributed to a number of anthologies.

You can learn more about Gerard on his website.

Appraisal:

Gerard Brennan is one of my favourite authors. He writes highly accomplished and gritty crime fiction. However, underneath the vast majority of his stories are softer human elements, the characters often existing in a dog-eat-dog world but fighting to be something more. One example is Bouncer, a short story from the previously reviewed Other Stories…

Danny is one of the main characters from Wee Rockets. His incarceration is supposed to turn him around, but as usual he’s simply revolting against the regime and fighting for position with his peers. Danny is unlikely to ever conform.

Then he comes across Conan Quinlan, who, of course, gets nicknamed The Barbarian. Conan is a gentle giant and displays some distinctly odd behavior at times. Danny isn’t sure whether he’s friend or foe. Whether he’s disabled or not. But they quickly, and unexpectedly (to Danny at least) form an increasingly strong bond.

The boys are offered some community support work at a nearby castle – time outside the institution is very rare – but Danny takes events into his own hands and a really touching and emotional series of events occurs. The element Mr. Brennan handles so well is that another person, loaded with his own problems, is what ultimately begins Danny’s transformation, not the rigidity of routine, law and psychology.

Overall Wee Danny is a powerful and touching story of friendship over adversity and disability. I’m not ashamed to admit I spent the majority of the tale smiling my stupid head off. Excellent writing in a small package that’s brought to a great conclusion with an economy of words. Perhaps Mr. Brennan’s best work to date. It’s no accident that another excellent Irish writer, Colin Bateman, rates him so highly.

Buy now from:    Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

Wee Danny is book 1 in Mr. Brennan’s, Wee Rockets Novella Series. Adult language.

Added for Reprise Review: Wee Danny by Gerard Brennan was a nominee in the Crime Fiction category for B&P 2014 Readers' Choice Awards. Original review ran August 8, 2013.

Format/Typo Issues:

None.

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: Keith Nixon

Approximate word count: 15-20,000 words

Monday, July 6, 2020

Review: I Wear My Sunglasses at Night by Paul Aster Cohen



Genre: Horror/Comedy/Fantasy/Vampires

Description:

“On vacation with her boyfriend, Nicky soon finds herself in a predicament as he's kidnapped by a tribe of vampires. Miles from home, she reluctantly joins a dwarf and his coyote, who have their own score to settle with the beasts, and travel across the country to try and save her man before he's gone for good. In the shadows of recent California forest fires, will Nicky defeat the hungry, bloodthirsty horde and perform an impossible rescue or will she become a victim herself?”

Author:

“Paul Aster Cohen is an award winning journalist for The News of San Patricio weekly newspaper and a fiction writer. His novellas, I Wear My Sunglasses at Night and Once Upon a Time in Rehab, will be released in the coming months. He is working on the second novel of his Koufax series while seeking agent representation. He spends what little free time he has with his wife and three children who live with him in Corpus Christi.”

Appraisal:

This novella, I Wear My Sunglasses at Night, was a welcome diversion. It’s a quick read full of action, gore, and humor. Nicky has convinced herself that her boyfriend is going to propose to her on this special trip they are on. Nicky is a health food freak and exercises every day. She has tried to change her boyfriend, Derrick’s, lifestyle to be like hers. Every time they argue Nicky strips 
all her clothes off and the arguing stops. Nicky feels like she won the argument.

When Derrick is ‘kidnapped’ by being forcefully taken from their motel room by vampires, Nicky isn’t going to let these goons take her man. She puts up a good fight, beaten to a bloody pulp, but keeps going back for more. I kept expecting to learn she has a super power, but no, she’s human. There are some surprising twists that keep the story moving forward as Nicky, her delusional dwarf protector, and his pet coyote, Sheky, hunt down the tribe of vampires who took Derrick.

Mr. Cohen’s colorful imagery and unique vampires pulls the reader into the story. I generally try to stay away from horror stories, and didn’t realize one of the genre tags was horror until I started writing my review. I’d call it horror-lite. The ending confrontation blew me away. I did cheer for Nicky every time she killed a vampire, even though I was totally grossed out. I would like to see I Wear My Sunglasses at Night go through another round of editing. The one thing that threw me out of the story is in the beginning Nicky’s hair is brown. Later in the story her hair is blonde. The other proofing errors are just an annoyance.

Bottom line — I Wear My Sunglasses at Night is a unique story with vampires. It’s a quick fun read with proofing issues. If those kind of things bother you then maybe this story is not for you. Otherwise, if you like kickass female leads with a quirky sidekick you’ll likely enjoy this novella.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

Lots of blood and gore as well as adult language that may not be acceptable for some readers. You’ve been warned…

Format/Typo Issues:

More proofing misses than there should be for this length of story. Mostly missing or extra words, as well as a few wrong words.

Rating: *** Three Stars

Reviewed by: ?wazithinkin

Approximate word count: 20-25,000 words

Friday, July 3, 2020

Reprise Review: No One’s Child by Judith L. McNeil



Genre: Memoir

Description:

This memoir, set in Queensland, Australia, begins in January 1948 when the author was five years old and ends nine years later as fourteen-year-old Judith awaits a train to Brisbane with her family. To reveal the reasons for her being at that railway station, or to explain with whom she waited for the train would be an unforgivable spoiler. For the first time, but not the last in this review, I recommend you read No One’s Child and find out for yourself. You won’t regret it.

Author:

There’s not much in the way of publicity for this author. She wrote her life story in two books: No One’s Child and The Girl With The Cardboard Port. Her bio on Amazon offers this: Judith L. McNeil lives in Queensland, Australia. She is now retired after decades spent working as a caregiver for the aged, but volunteering in the community is still very much a part of her life. Her interests other than writing are breeding Shitzus, landscape painting, and reading.

Appraisal:

Like all the “Pals”, I’m no learned literary expert, and normally that causes me no qualm. I select Indie stories from BigAl’s list as they catch my eye, read them, and give an honest opinion — my opinion. Maybe something of what I say about a work will appeal and make you think, “Yes, that sounds like an interesting read.” Or maybe my take will be sufficient to convince you that the piece isn’t for you, and you’ll move on to the next story — there are many from which to choose.

I confess to feeling inadequately equipped to give this story its due. But here goes. As Forrest Gump said when he sat on that park bench waiting for the bus he didn’t need to catch, “Mama always said life was like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're gonna get.”

And, for me, reading No One’s Child, selected by chance from Al’s list of 1500+ waiting works, was an extraordinary experience. I cannot express how happy I am that I didn’t pass it by.

In 1996, Frank McCourt’s memoir, Angela’s Ashes, became a worldwide best-seller and went on to win the Pulitzer for Autobiography. That story has many correlations with Judith McNeil’s memoir. In fact I can cut this review short for you: if you enjoyed Angela’s Ashes, you’ll enjoy No One’s Child. Mr. McCourt was raised in Limerick, Ireland, but the poverty and hardships endured and, more to the point, accepted as ‘just how it is’ by Frank and Judith (Judy) have a commonality that transcends the geographical separation of Ireland and Australia.

The staggering recall that both authors demonstrate is what sets these works apart. Personally, I remember only major incidents in my early years. Judy remembers the smell of the dirt dunnys (waterless, outside toilets). She remembers the feel of the air when the “willy whirlies” (miniature, and in some cases full-blown tornadoes) disturbed her world, or in one case wrecked the shanty town she lived in. She remembers the feel of a wild nanny goat who rubbed in friendship at her leg and allowed Judy to drink from its milk sac, and the sting of a snake bite as she picked wood from a pile to hand-build tomato boxes.

Risk was something she shared her life with, risk from the natural world she lived so close to, risk from friends who misunderstood her intelligence, and risk from the one constant from which she could not escape — her family. That she carried this risk on her own shoulders from such a young age might make you think her family was careless of her, but no, it was more that this was the way life was lived. Judy wasn’t a slave, but she was forced into a servitude of necessity.

Her story begins with a short chapter in which her mother, for the first time, opens up to her. The date is undefined, but Judith is clearly a grown woman at the time of the conversation. The hardships her mother endured, to an extent, put Judith’s own struggle in perspective. I wondered, after finishing the story, whether that chapter was her way of erasing some blame from her mother, of taking it on herself, as she had always had. Perhaps? In the story she quotes her mother saying, “(Once) I cried because I had no shoes, until one day I saw a child who had no feet.” In any case, although Judith had yearned to know her mother’s story, I found it poignant that when her mother finally opened up, Judy couldn’t wait to break the spell, to stop her mother talking, to escape from the knowing. Perhaps her heart had hardened too much in survival to allow the space for that level of forgiveness.

If you read No One’s Child (did I mention that I recommend you do?), prepare yourself for Judy’s honesty. In particular she lays bare her feelings toward her father, which fester like an infected wound, seeping, dangerous, and ever-present. But, without her honesty and her extraordinary memory, this story would lose its color, its depth, its layers. As with Angela’s Ashes, what makes this a compelling read is that, through all the hardships endured by the author, a love of people, of community, of animals . . . ,and of life, shines thorough.

I did not come away from reading No One’s Child feeling sorry for Judith McNeil, but rather, buoyed by her humanity, and humbled that she took the time to share her life with me.

To quote from the book’s short epilogue: “They say lilies rise from the mud. I know they do.”

I believe her.

In case I forgot to mention it, you should read No One’s Child.

Buy now from:    Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

Added for Reprise Review: No One’s Child by Judith L. McNeil was the WINNER in the Non-Fiction category for B&P 2014 Readers' Choice Awards. Original review ran November 10, 2013.

Format/Typo Issues:

No typos to mention. Australian dialect, but not an issue for comprehension.

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: Pete Barber

Approximate word count: 75-80,000 words

Wednesday, July 1, 2020

Review: Makeover Murder by Barbara Silkstone



Genre: Cozy Mystery/Humor/Woman Sleuth

Description:

“Olive Peroni was having a tough day. Her makeover client died a mysterious death before the woman could attend her husband’s inquest—where she would explain why she ran over him as he stood in front of her car putting coins in a parking meter.

Now Olive is both a suspect in her client’s murder and a victim-to-be. Can the Cold Cream team from the shop on Starfish Cove Beach catch the shadowy killer before he strikes again—killing the last person to see the makeover lady alive—Olive?”

Author:

“Barbara currently lives in Central Florida with her eccentric kitty who adores Liam Neeson and chasing lizards (the cat, not Barbara).”

Ms. Silkstone is the author of several series, from Regency to contemporary cozy mysteries. She has a wicked sense of humor, her many series are light-hearted and her off-beat quirky characters somehow come across as real people. To learn more about Ms. Silkstone visit her website or follow her on Facebook.
   
Appraisal:

I do believe Makeover Murder is the best story of this series so far. When Olive’s home makeover client ends up dead, Olive ends up being the last person to see her alive, thus making her the prime suspect. Grams thinking she has the inside scoop for a story in the Starfish Gazette, submits her article which clearly paints a bullseye on Olive’s back for the shadowy killer.

Not having a bad enough day already, Olive has an unexpected visit from her ex-husband professing his undying love, and she accepts custody of the murder victim’s pet cat, Minette, who hates her. Puff isn’t too pleased with the situation either.

With no clues or leads, and two attempts on Olive’s life, Lizzy decides to turn her flirtatious banter and wiggle walk on the victim’s handsome neighbor. The plot moves fast with unexpected twists and plenty of surprises that leaves the reader guessing. The ending is a tense, edge of your seat finale with an unexpected turn of events, but highly satisfying. Olive or should I say Ms. Silkstone, has me convinced to carry around a can of aerosol hairspray, and not just for protection. If you are a fan of cozy mysteries you are sure to love these quirky but interesting residents of Starfish Cove. Each book in this series, Cold Cream Murders Mysteries, can be read as stand-alone. However, with Ms. Silkstone’s witty and easy going style of writing you might find yourself going back to read the whole series.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

Makeover Murder is book 6 in Ms. Silkstone’s Cold Cream Murders Series and can be read as a stand-alone.

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues
Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: ?wazithinkin

Approximate word count: 35-40,000 words

Monday, June 29, 2020

Review: McKennas Path by Kasey Riley



Genre: YA

Description:

“Suzie McKenna has a desperate need to get away from her mom—and most importantly her mom’s creepy boyfriend. She comes up with the perfect way to escape, taking her beloved mustang mare, Gypsy, with her. She’ll ride to her father’s ranch. She has the knowledge, the maps, and the need; but does she have the ability?

Join Suzie and Gypsy as they make their way from Victor, Idaho to Dubois, Wyoming. Only the Bridger-Teton National Forest stands between them and the safety of her father.

When Gypsy is found loose and injured, can searchers find Suzie before it's too late?

Suzie's divorced parents, Mike and Sherry McKenna, share a burning need to locate their wayward daughter. Can they stand each other’s company long enough to get the job done? Ride with them as they answer this question and maybe even discover what tore their marriage apart.”

Author:

As an avid equestrian and lover of the outdoors, Kasey Riley is the author of several books. Those books are in multiple genres, but her interest in horses or the outdoors almost always figures into the story.

For more, visit Ms Riley’s website.

Appraisal:

This was a fun read. It had a lot of things going on. There was the suspense or thriller aspect of not knowing what is ultimately going to happen to Suzie, whether her parents will find her in time or not until it is too late, if at all. There is the storyline of Mike and Sherry, Suzie’s divorced parents, and the potential for partially mending their broken relationship or at least understanding better where things went wrong. Then for anyone familiar with the area where this story takes place, picturing the setting in your memory as the author describes it adds even more. (Although most people might not think an obscure town or two on the border of Idaho and Wyoming is anything they know about, the reality is that if you’ve been to Yellowstone or Grand Teton National Parks, you were close enough.) I’d recommend this not only to young adults, but also older adults as a change of pace, especially if you like the outdoors.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

A brief mention of something mildly sexual. (Nothing a teen in the target audience for this book hasn’t been exposed to in a typical school day.)

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues

Rating: **** Four Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 50-55,000 words

Friday, June 26, 2020

Review: The Bit Dance by Tilmer Wright, Jr



Genre: Science Fiction

Description:

What happens when millions of tiny minds find a way to work together? At what point do they become one? At what point are they no longer merely machinery, but actually alive?


Kayla Henry is a genius. She has a grasp of technology that far surpasses that of people three times her tender age of fourteen. She has mastered every skill she has attempted to acquire – except the ability to impress her father and appease his overbearing perfectionism.

The eBot is the newest offering from her father’s employer that will set the company’s course for as much as a decade. It is a revolutionary toy endowed with groundbreaking technology and an online community that will encourage consumers to share their experiences. Kayla is fascinated by it and longs to be a part of it in any way she can.

When an ex-KGB officer appropriates the technology for his own nefarious purposes, it responds in ways no one could predict – or even imagine.”
Author:


“Tilmer Wright, Jr. was born in Kingsport, Tennessee. He attended Florida State University where he earned a Bachelor's Degree in Computer Science. The past three decades have seen him working in various roles within Information Technology at a variety of companies in three states. He currently lives in Knoxville, Tennessee. He enjoys guitar, piano, art, reading and - when he has the time - writing.”

Appraisal:

This is the kind of science fiction that I tend to go for. The science is beyond where we are now, but not so far in the future where it seems unrealistic. This is near-future. I couldn’t rule it out happening next week or next year. That the science involved here was computer science hit my sweet spot yet again. If you’re into imagining where artificial intelligence or robotics might take us in the future, this should be right up your alley.

I thought the hero of the story, Kayla, was a great character. Her family dynamics with dad, mom, and a brother, each with their own talents as well as faults, made for an interesting family dynamic that may feel familiar to some readers. The story itself was entertaining, intense (keeping me on edge, racing toward a hopefully good resolution), and also has some things to consider about technology and the future. I’ll go with the obvious description here and say it is thought provoking.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues.

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 95-100,000 words

Wednesday, June 24, 2020

Reprise Review: Fusion by Imogen Rose



Genre: Young Adult/Paranormal

Description:

“This is the final book of the Portal Chronicles series. That, apparently, brings a conclusion to the time-and-dimension-hopping adventures of the two Arizonas, Arizona Stevens and her alter ego in another dimension, Arizona Darley.”

Author:

“Globetrotter Imogen Rose is Swedish by birth, went to college in London (where she received a PhD in immunology), and is now a Jersey girl. After her eight-year-old daughter insisted she write down her stories, Rose wrote the first of her Portal Chronicles series and decided to let it out into the world. The response was so positive that she’s continued with the series, and started two other series.”


Appraisal:

Since I became an avid reader at age 10, I have been a binge reader, and lover of series. Every free minute, weekends, and vacation time was devoted to reading as many books as I could fit in. This continued through my 38 years of teaching and first year and a half of retirement.  During the summer of 2010, I discovered the Portal Chronicles by Imogen Rose. I ripped through the first two books, and fell in love with the story and characters. I’ve always been intrigued with time travel stories, but had not read much YA or paranormal fiction.  I eagerly awaited the next two books in the series and ripped through those as well. Finally, in March of 2013, the last in this adored series was released while I was on vacation, and I had the same plan to read quickly to the end. That did not happen.

I read the prologue to Fusion and found myself stopping to think back on all of the characters…what they had gone through, how they had grown and changed, and what was going to happen to them in this final book. These characters had been living vividly in my brain for so long; they seemed real to me. I wanted to know the outcome, but was reluctant to reach the end and let them go. So, I stopped reading until I got home. Then, I read the first chapter and put it down again…contented to wait for more. I continued reading this way, until I finally finished the book two months later. I felt the way Lauren, Ms. Rose’s daughter, must have felt when she was waiting for the next installment of the story to be written for her. This is not to say that I won’t be prone to binge reading anymore, but I am glad to discover that reading can be just as satisfying done slowly over time.

I was disappointed that I did not finish the book in time to review it for the blog tour stop at Books & Pals; Al and ?wazithinkin’s reviews were an awesome double shot! It was a fitting and satisfying ending to this series, leaving the door open to some characters crossing over into one of Ms. Rose’s other series. I fell in love with Rupert, so I am hoping he is one to show up again. When I found out that there was going to be a supermoon June 23rd, it reminded me of the beautiful cover for Fusion, and prompted me to ask about a third review for the book to be posted. So, here it is; a review for a super series on the date of the supermoon. Thank you Ms Rose for leading me to a new way of reading, introducing me to such well developed, intriguing characters, exposing me to exciting paranormal events, and leaving me with the wish that I could find them all again.

Buy now from:    Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

Each of the books in this series relies on information from the previous book, so to experience the full enjoyment of the characters and understand the plot details, I recommend reading the books in order.

There is a small amount of adult language included.

Added for Reprise Review: Fusion by Imogen Rose was a nominee in the Young Adult category for B&P 2014 Readers' Choice Awards. Original review ran March 13, 2013

Format/Typo Issues:

None found.

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: Fredlet

Approximate word count: 75-80,000 words