Tuesday, November 28, 2023

Review: They Lie Here by N S Ford


 Genre: Psychological Thriller

Description:

Difficult to say much without massive spoilers. Kat Green (our protagonist) is intent on tracking down Roscoe Darke, reclusive leader of Eighties’ synth band Scorpio Hearts. She makes a thin living off this sort of thing. We get plenty of description of his picturesque home town, ‘Waelminster’ (which had me wondering which real English town it was based on – possibly Winchester? If anyone knows for sure, do let me know.)

Kat is a loner and a wanderer, for reasons which become clear as the book unfolds. Her past is pretty murky. Why that would make her want to investigate other people with murky pasts is part of the mystery. She wouldn’t want hers coming out, but … well, that’s what the book’s about.

There are many, short, chapters. Each one is titled and together they give a good clue at the outset that there is a second important strand to the book. Also musical. Also in the past. The two strands come together like a clap of thunder, making for a satisfying climax to the book.

Author:

N S Ford is the author of one other psychological thriller, We Watch You and two short story collections, After the Burning and A Strange Belief. She is also a book fanatic and blogger, and lives in the UK.

Her blog can be accessed here.

Appraisal:

Music is absolutely central to this book. The Amazon listing has it categorised under conspiracy and psychological thrillers. But although there is certainly mystery here, it’s barely a thriller. But, trust me, that doesn’t matter a bit. The setting is well laid out without becoming too intrusive. The music industry feels queasily real. The characters are many, but incisively yet economically drawn so it is easy to keep them clear in the mind. Clues are dropped judiciously from the beginning and throughout. Kat’s fascinating and important back story is relayed in such a way as to leave the reader increasingly eager to know more. And there is some interesting science fictional seasoning. The writing is supple and engaging.

If you enjoy popular music (especially of the Eighties and Nineties) you will be entertained by this book.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

Format/Typo Issues:

None

Rating: *****Five Stars

Reviewed by: Judi Moore

Approximate word count: 70-75,000 words

Saturday, November 25, 2023

Review: The Savage Moor by Robert Fael


 Genre: Crime Fiction

Description:

“The Exmoor Beast is a creature of myth and mystery. Some think it's a phantom. Others that it's actually a big cat that escaped from a private collection. The bloody carcasses of deer and sheep found on the moor are often quoted as proof of its existence.

Now for the first time the Beast has taken human prey, and attacks seem to be intensifying. Ex MI5 agent Hollis is called in to investigate.

What he uncovers is more than just moorland myth. It's a clash between a quiet farming community, and big city gangsters. Things are becoming increasingly violent, and the bodies they find have been pulverized with incredible force. Shotguns may be no match for AK47s, but it seems the people of Exmoor have a surprisingly fearsome ally.”

Author:

“When he was a small boy Robert’s mother left him out in the forest, hoping the fairies would leave a changling in his place. Or maybe he’d be snatched by a she-wolf.

Is it any wonder he turned out a bit odd?

Actually Robert had a very ordinary upbringing in rural England. As an adult he traveled and has lived in several parts of Europe. His current home is near Valencia in Spain. When not working or writing you’ll probably find him in one of the region’s many fine seaside hostelries enjoying tapas and a glass or two of tempranillo.”

For more, visit Mr Fael’s website.

Appraisal:

While it is accurate to describe this novella as crime fiction, it has some elements that spice things up a bit, for example the rumors of the beast that rumor and myth indicate has been sporadically attacking people in the area where the story takes place. While there were some glimmers of where the story might go, it kept me guessing to the end. The basic story is entertaining and I’d give this book a ranking of at least four stars were it not for one significant issue. I’d be reading along and  stumble, throwing me out of the story, when I’d hit a missing or wrong word or some other proofreading miss. The number of proofreading misses I noticed were more than I’d find acceptable in a full-size novel and (depending on where you draw the line) this is either a long novella or a short novel, less than half as long as an average novel.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

Some adult language.

Format/Typo Issues:

Way more proofreading issues snuck through than I find acceptable.

Rating: *** Three Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 30-35,000 words

Wednesday, November 22, 2023

Reprise Review: For the Love of Katie by Erica Lucke Dean


 Genre: Romantic Comedy/Chick-Lit

Description:

“Newlywed Katie Maxwell is ready to settle down and leave her amateur detective days behind. But when the veil of secrecy surrounding her husband’s latest project takes them to Europe, her penchant for sleuthing lands her in some serious hot foreign water.

Katie will need to think quickly to talk her way out of handcuffs and a Parisian jail cell. Too bad she doesn't speak French.”

Author:

Erica Lucke Dean: “After walking away from her career as a business banker to pursue writing full-time, Erica moved from the hustle and bustle of the big city to a small tourist town in the North Georgia Mountains where she lives in a 90-year-old haunted farmhouse with her workaholic husband, her 180lb lap dog, and at least one ghost.

When she's not busy writing or tending to her collection of crazy chickens, diabolical ducks, and a quintet of piglets, hell bent on having her for dinner, she's either reading bad fan fiction or singing karaoke in the local pub. Much like the main character in her first book, To Katie With Love, Erica is a magnet for disaster, and has been known to trip on air while walking across flat surfaces.

How she's managed to survive this long is one of life's great mysteries.”

To learn more about Ms. Dean and her books please visit her website or follow her on Facebook.

Appraisal:

Katie, who is now four months pregnant, gets arrested in Paris trying to spy on her husband, Cooper Maxwell, at his latest film shoot.  Unfortunately she isn’t carrying any ID to prove who she is. It could happen! At the end of To Katie With Love, the prior book in this series, the book skipped forward a year. While Katie is trying to convince the Paris police inspector, Henri Gaspard, who she is, the story jumps back, using this book to fill in the gap.

The hijinks and miscommunications at work are hysterical. All of Ms. Dean’s secondary character interactions are just as enjoyable as her main characters. They always add depth to the scenes. Vivian Allen, Cooper’s publicist, is a thorn in Katie’s side, and Cooper seems oblivious to Vivian’s advancements, which gives Katie the opportunity to rely on her own devices. We are then given the privilege of getting to know Katie’s parents, I think Katie takes after her mom a little more than she’s willing to admit. There is also no denying Katie is a gem in her father’s eyes. Cooper’s parents were both gems. Lizzie, Cooper’s mom, is excellent at reading people and knows how to get what she wants. Colin, Cooper’s father, is now enjoying his life since retiring from Her Majesty’s Diplomatic Service. One would expect him to be a stuffy old Englishman, which is far from the truth. They are both delightful and will be wonderful grandparents. And I’m not just saying that because they have chickens and goats on their estate in England.

The storyline moves at a good pace with a couple wrenches thrown in to complicate things. A lot of For the Love of Katie is a comedy of errors that were no fault of her own. Then there are memorable scenes that are Katie’s fault, these all involved too many adult beverages. The ending is perfect as Cooper defines being the perfect man by accepting and relishing Katie for who she is. For the Love of Katie is an enchanting read I highly recommend.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

Original review published May 9, 2017.

For the Love of Katie is book two in The Katie Chronicles. This book can be read as a standalone.

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues.

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: ?wazithinkin

Approximate word count: 80-85,000 words

Sunday, November 19, 2023

Review: Far From Mortal Realms by Karen A. Wyle


Genre: Fantasy

Description:

Negotiating with the Fair Folk is a tightrope walk over deadly perils. And even the most skilled can misstep.

The many wondrous realms the Fair Folk inhabit offer tempting opportunities for mortals hoping to benefit from faerie magic. But making bargains with the Fair Folk is a dangerous business, for the fae have a habit of leaving loopholes to snare the unwary. Father-and-daughter lawyers Abe and Adira have made a career out of helping their fellow humans reach such agreements safely.

Abe and Adira know the rules for dealing with Fair Folk: don't reveal your true name, don't say thank you, don't accept gifts, don't eat fae food, don't tell even the slightest of lies . . . . Oh, and always, no matter the provocation, be unfailingly polite.

A moment of carelessness, a brief lapse, and a professional defender of mortal interests may be in dire need of rescue.”

Author:

“Karen A. Wyle was born a Connecticut Yankee, but eventually settled in Bloomington, Indiana. She now considers herself a Hoosier. She is an appellate attorney, photographer, and mother of two.

Wyle's thoughtful and compassionate fiction includes SF, historical romance, and fantasy. She has also collaborated with several wonderful illustrators to produce picture books. Relying on her legal background, she has written one nonfiction resource, explaining American law to authors, law students, and anyone else interested in better understanding the legal landscape. Wyle's voice is the product of a lifetime spent reading both literary and genre fiction. Her personal history has led her to focus on often-intertwined themes of family, communication, the impossibility of controlling events, and the persistence of unfinished business.”

Appraisal:

I don’t read books in the fantasy genre very often and after I finished this I started wondering why. I’m not sure, but if every fantasy book was as good a read as this one, I might not read anything else. It has the three things that I look for in a book.

The first of these are characters, especially the main characters or protagonists. While not an absolute requirement, having likeable protagonists, people who you care about once you get to know them, helps keep you involved in the story. If you don’t care what happens to them, why finish reading the story? This delivers on that with Abe and his daughter Adira, the father/daughter team of attorneys who are this book’s protagonists, are likeable and had me pulling for them all the way.

The second critical item that this book delivers on is a goal. This is usually developed in the first part of the book and the characters move toward it until the end of the book with the possibility of the goal changing or evolving. In a romance book this would be the prospective couple getting together. In a police procedural it would be catching the guilty criminal. I’ll leave it to you to find out the goal of this story so as to not introduce any spoilers.

The third item a good book needs is a good story world. Often this is just our contemporary world in some random generic location that feels like it could be anywhere. For many stories, that’s enough. But the story world here is what sets this apart from most books in other genres. Part of the story takes place in the mortal world (that generic location above), but much of it takes place in other “realms” that are vastly different from our mortal world. These realms are unique, each populated by beings that are unique to their particular realm in what they look like, how they communicate, and other ways. Understanding and figuring out the different realms as our main characters have cause to visit them adds much to the story.

I’m glad I gave this one a try in spite of being a bit outside my normal reading choices and highly recommend it.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues.

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 80-85,000 words

Thursday, November 16, 2023

Review: Ubiquicity by Various Authors


 Genre: Cyberpunk/Science Fiction/Short Story Anthology

Description:

“It is the dawn of the 22nd century, and in the sprawling development known as ‘UbiquiCity,’ the most wealthy and powerful districts possess all the latest in smart technology, with every building, device and control system connected via the Internet Of Things.

The world is augmented and identity is fluid. Satellite-guided cars drive themselves. Busy drones fill the skies. Cloud-assisted bots perform once-human jobs. Appliances, vehicles, buildings, media devices, products, streetlights, roadsigns and even toilets communicate electronically, all under the watchful eye of the AI CitySystem. For the inhabitants of the UbiComp zones, life is sweet.

But not everyone in the city is so blessed.

Short stories by Niko Carcosa, Antony Copeland, Tod Davies, Tod Foley, DeAnna Knippling, SL Koch, Shariann Lewitt, Adrian McCauley, and T Reynolds paint a picture of a realistic future city where ubiquitous computing is the source of much innovation, renovation and social disruption.”

Author:

A variety of authors.

Appraisal:

This book starts out with a map of Union City. All of the ten stories in this anthology take place in this shared story world. The map and the stories also share some terminology to describe things in the shared story world, for example sprawl zones and squatter towns are what might be thought of as the slums (to use terminology from our times) of Union Town. This also takes places in the future where artificial intelligence is widespread and those that populate the planet where Union City is located are as likely to be a robotic creature as anything else. (Be aware that there is a glossary at the end. If you find yourself wondering about the meaning of some terminology then scanning the glossary before continuing might be a good idea.)

Cyberpunk, the genre label used to describe these stories, happens in a dystopian future and, like the dystopian genre, these stories make you think about the potential downsides of some directions the world is headed. I found it interesting, yet logical in many ways, that those who lived in the slums of Union City often seemed like the happier characters. As with any collection of stories from multiple authors, some of the stories grabbed me more than others, but overall I found them to be good reads that succeeded in getting me to wonder about what the distant future will bring.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

Some adult language.

Format/Typo Issues:

A small number of proofreading misses.

Rating: **** Four Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 105-110,000 words

Monday, November 13, 2023

Review: The Theft by Aaron Frale


 

Genre: Comic Crime/Thriller

Description:

“Certain death? Conspiracy that goes to the top? Robbery gone wrong? All in a day’s work…

F hired me to do a straightforward job, but there was a slight snag in the operation when what I stole was stolen from me. Three goons showed up at my door to not so politely tell me that I have 24 hours to deliver F’s goods or my body will never be recovered.

The real tragedy is that I haven't had my morning coffee...

Those punks better watch their back. Nothing comes between me and my coffee.”

Author:

When not writing Aaron Frale is also the guitar player for Spiral, a progressive metal band based in Montana, and the host of a podcast called Aaron’s Horror Show. He has books in multiple genres including science fiction, horror, and fantasy. The one thing the books normally have, regardless of genre, is what he calls “a comedic twist.”

Appraisal:

One quality about the protagonist of this book that jumped out at me from the first page is that he is a … I can’t use the word I want to and get away with it in some of the places where I’ll be posting this. I guess saying his butt is intelligent might fly. It turns out that this becomes more and more extreme as the tension level ratchets up which, since he makes his living as a criminal and tends to upset crime bosses which can result in serious repercussions, it happens a lot.

The result is a thriller, as you can’t help but feel the tension, hoping that he’ll somehow make it through each of the situations he (sometimes literally) falls into. But the more intense things come, the more humorous the things that he thinks and says become. You can’t help but laugh, or at least be amused, but with what is going on it might be a tense laugh. It makes for an interesting dynamic and an enjoyable read.

One thing that I’m not sure what to think of are the footnotes. Yes, I’m serious, footnotes in fiction. What you’ll find if you follow them is they take you to a section at the end of the chapter (or you can just wait and read them when get to the end of the chapter instead). These have what I’ll describe as side notes, background, or quick stories that aren’t needed for the main story, but provide additional background for what is going on or has happened to the character in the past. As I said above, I’m not sure what to think of them, but a reader could just ignore them and page past them at the end of each chapter and have no issue following the same story, but if you’re interested and don’t mind getting sidetracked, go ahead and read them. Whatever works for you.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

Some adult language.

Format/Typo Issues:

This review is based on an advance reader copy so I can’t gauge the final product in this area.

Rating: **** Four Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 40-45,000 words

Friday, November 10, 2023

Review: The Blissful Plague by Brady Koch


Genre: Post Apocalyptic

Description:

“Twelve-year-old Maggie, her mother, and their loyal dog, Penny, traverse desolate cities, guided by a well-worn travel book. A chance encounter with a solitary boy, entangles them in the perils of Plantation Oaks, a seemingly safe haven.

As secrets unravel, revealing the reasons behind their endless voyage, Maggie and her mother grapple with their complex past. This poignant tale speaks to survival, resilience, and the unbreakable bond between a mother and daughter, emphasizing the strength it takes to navigate a shattered world.”

Author:

Prior to this series Brady Koch had authored three collections of short fiction. This is the fourth and final book in the “All Our Forgotten Futures” series.

For more about Brady Koch visit his blog.

Appraisal:

I’ve loved all the books in this series and this final book is no exception. In it Maggie, a mature beyond her years twelve-year-old, and her mother grapple with some difficult decisions as her mother tries to help Maggie understand their pasts and prepare her for a future that no one on this planet has experienced before. This was an intense and thought-provoking series, made even more so given the world’s recent experience with the Covid pandemic. My only regret about the series is that it has come to an end.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

A small amount of adult language.

The novelettes in this series are written to stand alone. You could read this book without having read the others in the series and understand what is going on.

Format/Typo Issues:

This review is based on an advance reviewer copy of the book so I can’t gauge the final product in this area.

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 40-45,000 words

Monday, November 6, 2023

Reprise Review: Postcards from Mr. Pish Volume 2: A Cross Country Journal by K.S. Brooks


 Genre: Children’s Picture Book/Educational

Description:

Postcards from Mr. Pish: A Cross-Country Journal, Volume II follows the lovable Jack Russell Terrier as he embarks on a new adventure, traveling from Washington State all the way to Maryland, through ten states and four provinces of Canada. Mr. Pish writes fun postcards with full color photographs and maps highlighting his days so that children, and adults, can learn about our world in an entertaining and memorable way. Best viewed on a full-color device.”

Author:

“K.S. Brooks has been writing for over thirty years. An award-winning author and photographer, she has written more than 30 titles, is currently the administrator for the superblog IndiesUnlimited.com, and is founder of ‘Authors for Hurricane Sandy Library Recovery’ and the ‘Liberty Library’ for soldiers and veterans.”

Ms. Brooks Postcards from Mr. Pish educational series currently has eight volumes, which includes Mr. Pish's National Park Centennial Celebration: A Mr. Pish All Ages Activity Book. For more, visit Ms Brooks website.

Appraisal:

If you are not familiar with Mr. Pish, he is a loveable Jack Russel Terrier. His human is K. S. Brooks who loves to travel, take pictures, and write about her adventures through Mr. Pish’s eyes. Postcards from Mr. Pish is a wonderful educational series written to engage kids of all ages. I love the way Mr. Pish engages the reader by asking questions to inspire dialogue.

The format of the postcard on each page is clever. Most pictures surrounding each card include Mr. Pish in the environment he is visiting. In this volume Mr. Pish is traveling from Washington State across four provinces in Canada to Maryland. Mr. Pish gives readers a unique perspective documenting his travels that are engaging and entertaining. I highly recommend any book in this series.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

This is Volume Two in Mr. Pish’s, Cross Country Journal series. Which is also a part of Mr. Pish's Postcards Series. Best viewed on a full-color device.

Format/Typo Issues:

None

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: ?wazithinkin

Approximate word count: 2-3,000 words (30 pages)

Friday, November 3, 2023

Review: The Santa Strike by Shana Hammaker


 Genre: Speculative Fiction/Christmas

Description:

“While home in Midland, Texas on a weekend visit with the eccentric uncle who raised him, Marion (‘Mary’) Waclawski discovers a long-forgotten letter Uncle Joe wrote to Santa Claus. Mary keeps it to share with his girlfriend Lindsay and best friend Tommy. At first they consider the letter to be nothing more than a silly lark—what kind of grown man would write a letter to Santa? But soon Mary and Lindsay find themselves caught up in a much larger mystery, concerning many, many more letters to Santa, all surrounding the crisis of gun violence in America.

It’s a problem bigger than Texas, and a mystery bigger than Mary and Lindsay can solve on their own. Thankfully they discover they have willing and eager partners at the North Pole: Sandra and Kris Kringle, better known around the world as Mr. and Mrs. Claus! But can the Texans and the Clauses solve a mystery and a crisis no one else seems able to?”

Author:

After growing up in California Shana Hammaker bounced around the country a bit before landing in Austin, Texas where she now lives with her husband. Shana is the author of several books including memoirs, a novel, and several shorter works.

Appraisal:

Imagine that the neighbor kid who told you when you were ten that Santa wasn’t real didn’t know what he was talking about. That’s right, Santa is real. Now imagine the kids in the US who are scared by the stories of all the mass shootings they hear about and the active shooter drills they go through at school deciding to take action in the only way they an imagine making their dreams come true, by asking Santa to do something about gun violence in America for their Christmas present. If enough kids ask for this same thing, Santa will have to do something, right?

Exactly what was going on and how it was going to shake out kept me guessing and intrigued through the entire book. Along with an engaging story is plenty of background to give perspective and get the reader thinking about the issue of gun violence in the US. Ideally, we would be able to make some progress in improving things in that area without having to enlist Santa’s help, but just in case I know what I’m asking Santa do for me this Christmas. Give this a read and see if you agree.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

Some adult language.

Format/Typo Issues:

This review is based on a preliminary reviewer’s copy of the book, so I can’t judge the final product in this area.

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 55-60,000 words

Monday, October 30, 2023

Review: Chasing Sevens by Liberty Lane


 Genre: Literary Fiction/Contemporary Fiction/Coming of Age

Description:

“Good-natured yet na├»ve Tobi Stone has always been dealt an unfair hand.

Tobi dreams of becoming a successful musician but finds creative spirits are silenced in forgotten ‘fly-over’ towns. When his closest friend goes missing, a streak of luck leads him on a journey to find her.”

Author:

It appears that Liberty Lane grew up in a town in rural Ohio and her bio indicates that “Liberty’s main goal is to evoke emotion in her readers. She aims to craft characters and worlds that are realistic, tangible, thought-provoking, and sometimes controversial. Taking readers on a journey of love and loss, she explores gray areas of the modern world that typically fly under the radar.”

Appraisal:

This story drew me in with characters that I cared about and wanted to see how things turned out for them. Some readers might see the obvious flaws that Tobi, the protagonist, has and think poorly of him. However, as you get to know him better you come to realize that all things considered he is doing pretty good and that in those areas where he falls short (school work being the obvious one) it might be due to factors that cause that to be a lower priority. Tobi also has some dreams. This story of Tobi reaching for his dreams, learning and adapting his goals as he learns from life, is a good coming-of-age story with lessons to be learned for all of us buried in there.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

The author includes a trigger warning that this book at times touches on some topics that some readers may find troubling “including but not limited to drug and alcohol usage/abuse, childhood trauma, previous loss of a family member, sexual assault, various mental health topics, bullying, and domestic violence.” She recommends those who might find any of these topics to be an issue to “proceed with caution.”

Format/Typo Issues:

This review is based on an advance reviewer copy of the book, so I can’t gauge the final product in this area.

Rating: **** Four Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 105-110,000 words

Friday, October 27, 2023

Review: Sea Walk by Melissa Bowersock


 

Genre: Mystery/Paranormal

Description:

“A prominent family in Plymouth, Massachusetts is restoring a 250-year-old patriot smuggler’s mansion for conversion into a historical museum. The conversion is going well with one exception: there’s a ghost in the house, and the city council is not keen on exposing the public to that particular aspect of history. Paranormal investigators Lacey Fitzpatrick and Sam Firecloud are tasked with clearing the house of the ghostly presence, and although the storied history of Plymouth gives them plenty of clues, they’re still not quite prepared for the brutal and violent revelations that Sam uncovers.”

Author:

“Melissa Bowersock is an eclectic, award-winning author who writes in a variety of fiction and non-fiction genres: paranormal, biography, western, action, romance, fantasy, spiritual, and satire.”

For more visit Ms.Bowersock’s website and follow her on Facebook.

Appraisal:

I’ve read several of the books in this series and enjoy them every time. The basic premise is the same, a ghost is causing issues somewhere and someone calls Sam Firecloud in because he’s shown an ability to communicate with such beings and help them move on to the next realm, taking care of the issue. Essentially “unhaunting” some location. Sam’s partner, Lacey Fitzpatrick, helps him. She acts both as an observer and a researcher, helping him figure out who the ghost is and what they might require in order to move on. It’s a good formula, but just because you know from a high level how the book is going to go, doesn’t mean it isn’t still an entertaining and sometimes thought provoking read. As every reader of books in the romance genre will tell you, if the formula is a good one, then it can make for an unlimited number of great reads, and that’s what Melissa Bowersock has found with this series.

This book was interesting in that it had a couple surprises from what Sam and Lacey typically encounter. What that is specifically is a bit of a spoiler, so you’ll have to read it yourself to find out. The story takes place in Plymouth, Massachusetts, which provided an interesting setting with lots of history that figures into the story. Near the end of the book two of the characters are talking to Sam about what happened and ask if all of his cases surprise him, to which he gives an answer that indicates that they do, are “all pretty convoluted” and that he never knows what he’s going to encounter. As a reader, I feel the same, and it keeps me coming back for more.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

This is book #40 in the Lacey Fitzpatrick and Sam Firecloud Mystery Book series, but each book stands alone, so there is no need to have read any of the prior books in the series to understand this one.

Format/Typo Issues:

A small number of proofing errors.

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 25-30,000 words

Tuesday, October 24, 2023

Review: Sanctuary Motel by Alan Orloff


 

Genre: Thriller

Description:

“Mess Hopkins, proprietor of the seen-better-days Fairfax Manor Inn, never met a person in need who couldn’t use a helping hand—his helping hand. So he’s thrown open the doors of the motel to the homeless, victims of abuse, or anyone else who could benefit from a comfy bed with clean sheets and a roof overhead. This rankles his parents and uncle, who technically still own the place and are more concerned with profits than philanthropy.

When a mother and her teenage boy seek refuge from an abusive husband, Mess takes them in until they can get back on their feet. Shortly after arriving, the mom goes missing and some very bad people come sniffing around, searching for some money they claim belongs to them. Mess tries to pump the boy for helpful information, but he’s in full uncooperative teen mode—grunts, shrugs, and monosyllabic answers. From what he does learn, Mess can tell he’s not getting the straight scoop. It’s not long before the boy vanishes too. Abducted? Run away? Something worse? And who took the missing money? Mess, along with his friend Vell Jackson and local news reporter Lia Katsaros, take to the streets to locate the missing mother and son—and the elusive, abusive husband—before the kneecapping loansharks find them first.”

Author:

Award-winning author Alan Orloff has ten published novels as well as having his short fiction included in many publications.

For more about Alan Orloff, visit his website and follow him on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Appraisal:

This is being called book one of the Mess Hopkins series, which I hope means we’ll see the protagonist of this book staring in more stories in the future. Yes, people really do call him Mess. He’s got a real name which I’ve forgotten, but you’ll see it mentioned once or twice if you read the book. His mom started calling him Mess when he was a kid and it stuck as a nickname. With a name like that it makes sense that he runs a family-owned dive motel. He’s the boss there. In reality he has a manager who takes care of most of the important stuff while Mess is causing and then getting out of various messes. (Not what his mom had in mind when she nicknamed him that.) While the manager likes to rent the rooms of the motel out to paying customers, the number of actual paying customers tends to be fairly small, at least partially because Mess makes a habit of offering free temporary housing to those in need.

While there are a few other people Mess helps in this book, the main story focuses on a mother who flees an abusive husband with her teen son. Mess gives them a place to stay while mom figures out her next steps. Then things get complicated putting Mess in the position of trying to work out a few mysteries when the Mom disappears and other unexpected things happen. I liked the mystery and suspense aspects of the book which ultimately define the genre of the story, but I also found Mess and his approach to life and helping people to be a positive in the story and an interesting springboard to the main parts of the story.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

A small amount of adult language.

Format/Typo Issues:

Review is based on an ARC (advance review copy), so I’m unable to gauge the final product in this area.

Rating: **** Four Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 75-80,000 words

Friday, October 20, 2023

Reprise Review: For the Love of Katie by Erica Lucke Dean


 

Genre: Romantic Comedy/Chick-Lit

Description:

“Newlywed Katie Maxwell is ready to settle down and leave her amateur detective days behind. But when the veil of secrecy surrounding her husband’s latest project takes them to Europe, her penchant for sleuthing lands her in some serious hot foreign water.

Katie will need to think quickly to talk her way out of handcuffs and a Parisian jail cell. Too bad she doesn't speak French.”

Author:

“After walking away from her career as a business banker to pursue writing full-time, Erica moved from the hustle and bustle of the big city to a small tourist town in the North Georgia Mountains where she lives in a 90-year-old haunted farmhouse with her workaholic husband, her 180lb lap dog, and at least one ghost.”

Appraisal:

In To Katie with Love (the first book in this series) between the penultimate and final chapter, the story jumps ahead a year. A lot of things have changed for our protagonist, Katie, and her love interest, Cooper, during that interval. This story looks back on that period and tells the story of how Katie and Cooper jumped from point A to point B.

While a lot changes in that year, the things that don’t change are just as critical. Katie is still clumsy. She worries just a little too much. And she’s … snoopy might be a nice way to put it. In other words, none of the things that made Katie so loveable and her first story such a fun read have changed which made For the Love of Katie a fun read as well. For what it’s worth, I think Cooper is a saint.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

Original review published May 9, 2017.

Mild adult situations.

While this is the second book in a series it can be read as a standalone.

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues.

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 80-85,000 words

Monday, October 16, 2023

Review: The Hotline at the End of the World by Brady Koch


 

Genre: Science Fiction/Suspense

Description:

“In a world paralyzed by an unprecedented outbreak, Clint mans the CDC hotline, a solitary beacon of dwindling hope. Then, one fateful day, a call comes in. Clint finds himself navigating a delicate situation involving a mysterious woman, hinted at in classified files, who may possess the coveted cure. As the world remains under a suffocating lockdown, Clint's every word, every choice, holds the weight of untold futures.

The Hotline at the End of the World is a gripping narrative of responsibility and suspense, set in a reality where a single phone call can alter the course of humanity.”

Author:

Prior to this series Brady Koch had authored three collections of short fiction. This is the third book in the “All Our Forgotten Futures” series with one more book in the series slated for release sometime before the end of 2023.

For more about Brady Koch visit his blog.

Appraisal:

I’ve read and enjoyed the first two books in the series that this book continues, but this one is, by far, the one that I’ve enjoyed the most. Part of that is that the first two books set things up so well for this one. Even though this book can be read as a stand alone I felt like the background and feel for the story world I got from reading those prior books in the series helped draw me into the story even quicker than I would have otherwise. As far as that goes the experience the world got with the Covid pandemic over the last few years was a great setup for this series. Just imagine that experience and jack up the intensity several orders of magnitude and you’ll have an idea of what this series is like. One of the prior books involved Sarah Glen, a woman who scientists believe has DNA that is the key to being able to vaccinate against the deadly virus they are experiencing. Word has gotten out and now the CDC (Center for Disease Control) has a hotline that people who believe they have found Sarah Glen can call. However, the reality of this hotline is complicated, as you’ll see when you read this book. It made for an intense, thought-provoking read that I couldn’t put down.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

The novelettes in this series are written to stand alone. You could read this book without having read the others in the series and understand what is going on.

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 25-30,000 words

Friday, October 13, 2023

Review: Ascension of the Phoenix by Jessica Piro


 Genre: Suspense/Thriller

Description:

“Detective Leila Wells has apprehended every criminal to cross her path, except for one. And when Bryan Foster returns, he devastates her world. To cope, she finds release in street fighting.

Successes with her fighting partner grant them an invitation to participate in the Rulers of the Realms Fighting Tag Tournament. But as she fights, a power begins to rise within her—a dark and angry blaze urging her toward revenge.

To rise from ashes, one must be a phoenix.”

Author:

Jessica Piro has multiple health issues the keep her confined to a wheelchair, but that hasn’t prevented her from being the first in her immediate family to graduate from college, and she gets lots more action through her characters as an author who writes in multiple genres, mostly thriller and suspense. For more, visit Ms Piro’s website.

Appraisal:

The thing that strikes me most about this book is that it is different from what you might expect at first glance, and yet still a satisfying read. The protagonist, Leila Wells, is a police detective, which could reasonably lead you to believe that she would be searching for a criminal who committed a specific crime. And she does a bit of that, but it isn’t the focus. The genre labels used to describe the story are thriller and suspense, and it fits those. But there is also a big part of the story that could be described as paranormal or supernatural or some such term, or maybe it is all just in Detective Wells head, and those labels wouldn’t fit. I’m sure different readers will have different interpretations. Ultimately the result is a tale that delivers on the promised suspense and thrills in a story with some unique qualities for the genre.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

Format/Typo Issues:

A small number of proofing misses.

Rating: **** Four Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 90-95,000 words