Friday, May 29, 2020

Review: It Was a Dark and Stormy Night by Chester Oliver



Genre: Memoir

Description:

“From the moment he was born, Chester Oliver found life to be a puzzle. Worse, it was a puzzle to which, it seems, he hadn’t been given all the pieces. Even his name was a source of bafflement. For years, he thought his name was Butch. Then, when he reached school age, he learned the truth. What the hell! In those days, the name Chester conjured up images of Matt Dillon’s limping, drawling sidekick on Gunsmoke. Chester Oliver might as well have handed the bullies a ‘kick me’ sign. And that was just for starters. Like his namesake, Chester Oliver shuffled his way through ticks and snakes, bicycle and car wrecks, girls with clothes on and off—even an ornery horse aiming to throw him. All the while, he was trying to answer the question: ‘How did I get here?’”

Author:

Born in Northern Wisconsin, raised in Wisconsin and Texas, Chester Oliver has led a nomadic life, worked a variety of jobs, and is now settled in Montana with his wife Jan where he lives in a “Victorian house on a tree lined street.”

Appraisal:

This is billed as part 1 of “The Chester Chronicles,” so presumably there is at least one more volume, maybe several, planned for the future. Odds are you’ve never heard of Chester Oliver until now and may be wondering why you’d want to read about his life in a series of memoirs. That’s a fair question.

I’ve had a theory that most random people, especially those who are “of a certain age” and therefore have a lot of years of experiences to draw on could, assuming appropriate writing skills, write a memoir that many (myself included) would find to be an interesting read. I find myself going from comparing my experiences (yeah, I remember what it was like to move to the new town and be the new kid in the neighborhood) to nostalgia at time. Sometimes an experience I hadn’t had, for example his frequent fishing at a lake cabin with family, I’d imagine as much like those of a friend of mine whose family owned a fishing resort in rural Minnesota. Experiences that aren’t like anything I or anyone I know well have had are a chance to put myself in someone else shoes and hopefully learn a bit about viewing things from a different point of view.

With the exception of one experience and it’s aftermath that didn’t happen until fairly close to the end of the book, Chester’s experiences weren’t a whole lot different from what many of us have experienced in life, yet they’re still his unique combination of experiences and, I found reading about them entertaining and a positive experience. To me, that’s what memoirs are about, and there is often as much, if not more, to be learned from a normal person than from someone famous, infamous, or outside of the norm in some way.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        AmazonUK

FYI:

Some adult language.

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues.

Rating: **** Four Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 80-85,000 words

Wednesday, May 27, 2020

Review: The Joke’s on Me by Laurie Boris




Genre: Contemporary Fiction/Romantic Comedy/Humor

Description:

“Stand-up comic Frankie Goldberg’s Hollywood life falls apart with an exclamation point when a mudslide destroys her hopes, her home, and her entire collection of impractical footwear. She returns to her mother’s B&B in Woodstock, New York, expecting the comfort that home once provided, but continually finds that the joke’s on her. In Frankie’s absence, some things have changed—and some, to her dismay, are exactly as she’d left them. A lighthearted-but-serious romantic comedy about love, trust, second chances, squabbling sisters, and baseball.”

Author:

“Laurie Boris has been writing fiction for almost thirty years and is the award-winning author of eight novels. When not playing with the universe of imaginary people in her head, she’s a freelance copyeditor and enjoys baseball, reading, and avoiding housework. She lives in New York's lovely Hudson Valley.”

Appraisal:

Thirty-something Frankie Goldberg’s life has hit another huge bump in the road in California. With only the clothes on her back, and a red corvette, she’s headed home to her mom’s Bed and Breakfast in Woodstock, New York to regroup and figure out what’s she’s going to do to move forward. Frankie has many talents. One is to help people prioritize and guide them to focus their energy to achieve success. The problem is she’s not sure what she wants to do now.

When she arrives home to the B&B she is shocked to see what direction her older sister, Jude, has taken to save the B&B from financial ruin. Jude Goldberg has found success in New York City’s corporate world. However, with her having to divide her time between the B&B and her real job things are getting dicey there as well. Jude is also dealing with the impending empty nest syndrome as her son is planning his future, deciding between college or jumping straight to Hollywood to pursue his future as a movie producer.
What originally brought Jude back home to the B&B is their mother had a stroke and Jude had to admit mom into a nursing home alone, without help or opinions from Frankie. This is a source of friction between the sisters. Frankie also feels a sense of abandonment from the way Jude left home years ago to a less than perfect start of her own life.

What I found captivating about The Joke’s on Me are all the relationship angles explored. Frankie is the one who had the most soul searching to do and the story is told through her point-of-view so we know what’s going through her head. The dialogue is witty, realistic, serious, and humorous at times — since that is how Frankie deflects. When Frankie learns that her preteen crush, Joey Mazzerella, is back in town after a failed big league baseball career and a divorce, Frankie is ready to jump his bones. He’s the reason she loves baseball, and he now coaches a local Double A Baseball Team, The Dukes. They happen to be in the running for the league championship this season. Luckily, Joey has had time to reassess his life and insists on taking things a whole lot slower than Frankie finds comfortable, which gives her time to prioritize what’s really important to her and it is not a one-night stand. However, is Joey enough reason to move back to Woodstock?

The Joke’s on Me is a thoroughly enjoyable read, and will stand alone from the prequel, Catering Girl. Now I want to know if there will be a third book in this series. I really want to know what is in letters Frankie and Jude found in a box their mother had saved and tucked away for safe keeping.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues.

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: ?wazithinkin

Approximate word count: 95-100,000 words

Monday, May 25, 2020

Reprise Review: Keep Me Ghosted by Karen Cantwell



Genre: Humor/Paranormal Romance/Ghosts

Description:

“Desperate to pay the bills, 29-year-old Sophie ignores the advice of her stuffy spirit-friend, Marmaduke Dodsworth, and takes a job with the handsome Dr. Callahan, an optometrist with a desperate situation of his own. The good doctor's problem? He has a spirit-friend as well: one with a fiery crush and a vicious jealous streak. When chemistry starts to brew between Sophie and Dr. Callahan, his green-eyed ghost wreaks some bad-tempered havoc, scaring away his patients and putting Sophie on edge. Will Sophie give up the ghost and quit the new job, or buck up and find a way to rid Dr. Callahan of his pesky specter, freeing their romance to find a life of its own?”

Author:

In another life, before Karen Cantwell started writing full time, she had a different, very rewarding job – a vision therapist. She decided to give her male romantic hero a profession that was more specific than just, a lawyer, or a doctor, or a coffee shop barista. They say write what you know, and one thing she knew very well, was vision therapy. Her own husband is an optometrist in this specialized field, and the reason why she became a vision therapist, herself. Hence, the decision was made, Cal Callahan would be a developmental optometrist – an eye doctor who specializes in diagnosing and treating patients (by and large, children) with Learning-related Vision Disorders.

To learn more about Ms. Cantwell and her successful Barbara Marr Murder Mystery series, the check out her website or follow her on Facebook.

Appraisal:

I have read several of Ms. Cantwell’s books, the Barbara Marr Murder Mystery series is one of my favorites. When I heard she was writing a ghost story I was pleased to see her branching out into the paranormal; one of my favorite genres. She has an easy-going style to her writing that makes it a pleasure to read.

I dearly loved Marmaduke. He is such an English gentleman, and I think the author pulled off his verbose English dialect quite well. I found Sophie and Marmaduke’s dialogue thoroughly entertaining and I loved their relationship. I was glad to learn he is sticking around for a few more books. The chemistry between the reserved Dr. Callahan and Sophie was charming and natural. The story setting and characters are unique which set up the book to be an interesting and educational read. As with all of Ms. Cantwell’s writing there is a mystery to unravel with unexpected twists in the plot. The humor flows well and is not over-the-top or slapstick. I was also pleased that Sophie is a fully-fledged character in her own right; she is not a rewritten Barbara Marr, but I like her just as well. This is a light, fun, quick read that leaves you feeling satisfied in the end.

Buy now from:    Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

I think this book will teach us all to stay away from internet magic spells. Keep Me Ghosted is book 1 in the Sophie Rhodes Ghostly Romance series.

Added for Reprise Review: Keep Me Ghosted by Karen Cantwell was a nominee in the Paranormal Romance category for B&P 2014 Readers' Choice Awards. Original review ran May 1, 2013

Format/Typo Issues:

I found no significant issues with editing or formatting.

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: ?wazithinkin

Approximate word count: 55-60,000 words

Friday, May 22, 2020

Review: The Heroes Journey by John Henry Amlien



Genre: Short Story/Medieval Fantasy/Adventure

Description:

“A sociopathic super wizard joins the Wizards guild. A guild where heroes are made and commercialized. When things don’t go according to plan, he decides to improvise. A not-so-bright young and inexperienced wizard joins him along the way.”

Author:

“In 2018 John, after a lot of thinking, finally decided he was going to become an author. In 2020, still working on his big epic, he decided to let a short story, which he had written in the meantime, be his first published book.”

The Heroes Journey is Mr. Amlien’s debut story.

Appraisal:

In The Heroes Journey we follow Wizard Urick as he tries to turn Frank Fury into a Hero. Simply because Frank has a heroic sounding name. Urick’s means are unconventional, to say the least. Tendust is a young wizard who recognizes Urick and wants to become his apprentice so he regales Urick with false accomplishments. Urick knows Tendust is on to him so he tries to shake him off, but that’s not going to happen. Tendust sees Urick as a meal ticket. It’s an enjoyable ride as Urick tries to make his lies sound like the truth, as he leads his small troupe of unskilled warriors to destroy Tyson the Zombie King.

The Heroes Journey is an imaginative and fun romp as Urick defies the rules to turn Frank into his first Hero. The dialogue and inner thoughts of Urick are highly entertaining. If you want to know how real heroes are made this is the story for you. Hahaha. However, it will make you think about how much praise can actually affect change in a person’s life.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

The Heroes Journey is book 1 in Mr. Amlien’s, The Adventures of Urick and Tendust Series. Even though the book cover may attract younger readers, be warned there is a lot of colorful adult language.

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues.

Rating: **** Four Stars

Reviewed by: ?wazithinkin

Approximate word count: 9-10,000 words

Wednesday, May 20, 2020

Reprise Review: Bitter Nothings by Vicki Tyley



Genre: Mystery

Description:

“Half her family have been murdered in their beds. Her father is the prime suspect. And things are about to get a whole lot worse...

Graphic designer Dervla Johns wakes one morning to the news that her father, Warren, is missing and her stepmother and step-siblings were found dead in their beds. While the police hunt for Warren, Dervla searches for answers. Could her father really be a killer? Refusing to be warned off by police threats, or intimidated by the reporter who appears to be following her, she delves into her family's past.

But as she uncovers one shocking secret after another, Dervla's world is rocked further by another murder - and she finds herself desperately trying to untangle a web of illicit love and betrayal. Soon, Dervla must face her greatest fear... or suffer the same deadly fate as her stepmother.”

Author:

A native of New Zealand, Vicki Tyley currently lives with her husband in rural Australia and is the author of several bestselling mysteries for your Kindle, including Thin Blood, picked by Amazon as a “Customer Favorite” in 2010.

For more, visit Tyley’s website.

Appraisal:

I’ve read all of Vicki Tyley’s books and they all have some qualities that keep me coming back starting with well-constructed plots with multiple “suspects” to choose from. I’ve yet to figure out whodunit until just before the climax, often getting completely blindsided. (I then think back to the clues and realize they were all there, if I’d only seen them.) The tension tends to be high, like a thriller, with the protagonist often in danger (or at least feeling they are). The protagonist is always someone I like and find myself pulling for them to solve the mystery. The Australian settings and characters add a little spice, setting them apart and giving me a change of pace from the norm.

Bitter Nothings has all of these qualities which leaves me feeling that I don’t have anything new to say (other than “buy this book, you’ll like it”). So, buy this book, you’ll like it.

Buy now from:    Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

Although the author is Australian, it appears that she used US spelling conventions in this book.

Added for Reprise Review: Bitter Nothings by Vicki Tyley was the WINNER in the Mystery category for B&P 2014 Readers' Choice Awards. Original review ran September 19, 2013.

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues.

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 70-75,000 words

Monday, May 18, 2020

Review: Coldwater by Tom Pitts



Genre: Noir/Crime/Thriller

Description:

“After a miscarriage, a young couple move from San Francisco to the Sacramento suburbs to restart their lives. When the vacant house across the street is taken over by who they think are squatters, they're pulled into a battle neither of them bargained for. The gang of unruly drug addicts who've infested their block have a dark and secret history that reaches beyond their neighborhood and all the way to the most powerful and wealthy men in California.

L.A. fixer Calper Dennings is sent by a private party to quell the trouble before it affects his employer. But before he can finish the job, he too is pulled into the violent dark world of a man with endless resources to destroy anyone around him.”

Author:

“Tom Pitts is a Canadian/American author and screenwriter who received his education on the streets of San Francisco. He remains there, working, writing, and trying to survive.” Pitts is the author of several other books.

Appraisal:

A tense read. A bit of a mystery, putting together who all the players are, how their stories fit together, and where things are going to go. It kept me guessing, on my toes, and all those other clich├ęs you’d hope to read in regards to a book like this. In some ways it felt like the answers to some of those questions were also a bit cliched (the man with endless resources mentioned in the book description), but realistically they say that every plot has already been written and all an author can hope for is to put their own unique twists on it. Pitts certainly did that. If you’re into crime fiction, this is a solid effort and well worth your time.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

Plenty of adult language.

Format/Typo Issues:

Review is based on an uncorrected advance reader copy, so unable to gauge final product in this area.

Rating: **** Four Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 60-65,000 words

Friday, May 15, 2020

Review: Chasing Eve by Sharon Heath



Genre: General Fiction/Women’s Fiction

Description:

“Everyone expected big things from Ariel Thompkins. Wasn’t she the girl who’d roped her friends into one madcap adventure after another, who’d met the challenge of losing both parents before turning eighteen, who’d gone on to graduate summa cum laude from UCLA? So how did this livewire end up delivering the day’s mail for the U.S. Postal Service, hunkering down each night with her half-blind cat in front of the TV, ruminating over the width of her thighs? It looked as though it would take a miracle to get her out of her rut.

Who knew that miracle would come in the form of an acutely candid best friend and a motley crew of strangers—a homeless drunk once aptly nicknamed “Nosy,” a lonely old woman seeing catastrophe around every corner, a shy teenager fleeing sexual abuse, a handsome young transplant from the Midwest with a passion for acting and for Ariel herself? Not to mention the fossil remains of a flat-faced crone who just might have been the ancestress of everyone alive today?

Chasing Eve takes us on a funny, sad, hair-raising adventure into the underbelly of the City of Angels, where society’s invisible people make a difference to themselves and to others, and where love sometimes actually saves the day.”

Author:

“Sharon Heath writes fiction and non-fiction exploring the interplay of science and spirit, politics and pop culture.” 

Find out more about Ms Heath at her blog.

Appraisal:

Trying to decide what it was that appealed to me about this book I came to a strange realization. It wasn’t the story. Well, maybe that isn’t fair. There are a few story threads that together make up this book, a couple related to the protagonist Ariel’s struggles with different aspects of life and another about her quest to sneak in and see the fossilized remains of what she imagines as one of the first people on Earth. A novel has to have a story, and this one does, and I liked that story. But what appealed to me the most were the characters. They ranged from rich to poor, from young to old and on to ancient (literally) in the case of Eve, the fossilized remains already mentioned. In spite of a wide variety of characters I found each of them got me thinking, entertained me, and showed me something in the way they viewed the world that I could learn from or at least better understand others from what they had to show me. A great book needs both a good story and good characters. Chasing Eve delivers on both.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

A small amount of adult language.

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues.

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 100-105,000 words

Wednesday, May 13, 2020

Review: Dreamland: A Ghost Story by Nick Clausen


Genre: Magical Realism/Ghosts/Young Adult

Description:

“In his dreams, Louie begins visiting an alternate reality where he meets his father, who died when Louie was still a baby. At first, it seems like a wonderful opportunity for Louie to finally get to know his dad. But things aren’t exactly what they seem, and great horrors loom very close by.

The place Louie enters in his sleep—called Dreamland—is only a small part of the dreamworld. All around it lies The Outskirts. That’s where nightmares come from. And the creatures who live there are constantly on the lookout for new prey. Someone they can lure in and catch. Someone they can keep as their prisoner for all eternity.

Will Louie lose himself forever in dreams? Or will he manage to wake up in time?”

Author:
“Nick Clausen writes chilling horror and apocalyptic tales so that he doesn't need to work a real job. He lives in a tiny country far, far away and he grew up on rye bread porridge and Stephen King books.

Published in four different languages, he has written several popular books, including They Come at Night and Human Flesh, and is right now working on ending the world one day at a time in his zombie series Dead Meat.”

To learn more about Mr. Clausen please visit his website.

Appraisal:

Louie is a twelve-year-boy who has started having dreams that take him to a realm of dreams he learns to call Dreamland. The colors are off, but it looks like a small town with a park, a railroad, and stores. However, the only person there is a man in a blue suit and Louie. The blue suit man stays at a distance until he feels like he can approach Louie without scaring him. Blue suit man aims to earn Louie’s trust above all else. Blue suit man shows him around Dreamland. It’s a small contained perfect world which is surrounded by the outskirts. The outskirts are gray and gloomy. It is where monsters and nightmares live. Blue suit man tells Louie he is his father who died when Louie was one year old. Stories his dad tells Louie turn out to be true when he fact checks with his mom. So Louie uses his time in Dreamland to get to know his father. Louie is totally enthralled with his dad, and he feels safe escaping to Dreamland.

Louie’s mom, Ellen, still mourns her husband’s death from cancer eleven years ago. She has a fear of commitment, which manifests in moving every few months, but not out of the town they live in. Louie locates the house they used to live in as a small family. It’s abandoned, run down, and is rumored to be haunted, which Louie dismisses. When Louie starts spending too much time in Dreamland things start to go sideways. Louie is losing control and tension goes into overdrive as the darkness starts to move around and claim Louie.  

The rich description of Louie and his mom’s world put you in the story. Dreamland is easily watched from afar, and the darkness is all consuming and unrelenting. So hold on to your wits, and your seat for this wild ride.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

Format/Typo Issues:

Only a few proofing misses, nothing that threw me out of the story.

Rating: **** Four Stars

Reviewed by: ?wazithinkin

Approximate word count: 35-40,000 words

Monday, May 11, 2020

Reprise Review: Maisy May 2 by Naomi Kramer



Genre: Young Adult

Description:

“Maisy is pregnant, and moving to Sydney. How will the country kid cope with the big city - and how will the big city cope with Maisy?”

Author:

“Naomi is an Australian author living on Macleay Island, in south-east Queensland. She works in IT, and loves to play with the English language in her spare time. She's usually found sporting brightly-coloured hair and wielding a mug of coffee as though it's her last bastion against a comatose state.”

Kramer also has two other series (all novellas), the Dead(ish) series and her Bad F*ck series of short story collections about less than perfect experiences with … um, I’ll let you figure that out yourself.

Be sure to check out Ms. Kramer’s updated book lists on her Amazonauthor page.

Appraisal:

I’ve read and liked all of Naomi Kramer’s books, but Maisy May, her first book and the first in this series, stood above all the others as my favorite. In fact, it ranks among my favorite reads of the last several years. After waiting more than three years for the second volume of the planned trilogy, it has finally arrived.

Much of what I liked about this book are the same things I loved in the first book. Maisy combines irreverence and (at least outwardly) a devil-may-care attitude with smarts and maturity beyond her years. In this chapter of her life Maisy and her Mom move into the bottom floor apartment of a house owned by a recently divorced Pastor who is the father of Mark, Maisy’s gay friend and the father of her baby. Describing this sounds like a soap opera or a bad reality show, but it doesn’t read anything like either as Maisy struggles with pregnancy, motherhood, school and, most important, how to make the relationship between her, Mark, and their new baby, Emily, work.

This was an excellent continuation of Maisy’s story. Please don’t make me wait another three years for the conclusion.

Buy now from:    Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

The author is from Australia and uses slang and spelling conventions from her native country.

This is the second book in the series and I highly recommend reading Maisy May, the first in the series, because it is so good. However, the brief introduction sets the stage well for a reader who wants to read this as a standalone. (It also refreshes memories for those of us who read the first book a long time ago.)

Added for Reprise Review: Maisy May 2 by Naomi Kramer was a nominee in the Young Adult category for B&P 2014 Readers' Choice Awards. Original review ran August 16, 2013.

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 25-30,000 words

Friday, May 8, 2020

Reprise Review: Strange Academy by Teresa Wilde



Genre: Paranormal Romance/Mystery/Urban Fantasy

Description:

“Determined to uncover the secret behind her eccentric aunt's mysterious death, Sadie Strange, a quirky substitute teacher with a Master’s degree in comic book superheroes, takes a job at isolated private school Strange Academy. Her biggest obstacle? Haughty hottie Lorde Gray, the chemistry teacher who looks down his Roman nose at her as he tries to get her fired.”

Author:

“By day, Teresa Wilde is a mild-mannered technical writer, but by night (and lunch hours, and weekends) she's a digital Sheherezade, weaving tales of strange and wondrous places and people.”

Strange Academy is her third first novel. She is currently working on a Regency Urban Fantasy, plus the sequel to Confessions of a Teenage Demon Magnet and the next book in the Strange Academy cycle. Check out her Blog. Ms. Wilde also publishes erotic romances under the pen name Teresa Morgan.

Appraisal:

This book caught me a little off guard; I assumed by the cover it would be a light-hearted funny read. And it was that, but it was also so much more. Ms. Wilde did a wonderful job building her characters and exploring their backgrounds so we understood why each one was the way they were. Knowing the psychological makeup gave her characters depth and a more human quality making it easier to identify with them.

Sadie has denied who she really is her whole life because she wanted to fit in and be normal, unlike her strange Aunt Pippa, her witch mother, and her psychic older sister. She also has no idea why Aunt Pippa has recommended that she take over Pippa's classes at Strange Academy after her death. However she is determined to find out how and why Aunt Pippa died so unexpectedly. The whole campus is on alert to keep anything magical from Sadie as long as she is there and she seems more than willing to turn a blind eye or find logical, mundane reasons for anything she cannot readily explain. She is smart, logical to a fault, strong-willed, and witty. Sadie has also built walls around her heart after falling for the wrong type of man one too many times. So when she meets Lorde Gray at Strange Academy she instantly dislikes him because he is exactly the type she is known to fall for.

Lorde Gray was a character that was hard to like at first. He was egocentric, overbearing, and controlling. The perfect alpha male type. But as the story develops and we get to know more about his history he becomes quite swoon-worthy. However he has a lot of pride and Sadie becomes quite adept at challenging his pride which was fun to watch.
Most of this story deals with the teachers and administrators of Strange Academy instead of the students, so the theme is more adult oriented. Although two of the students in Sadie's class have a larger role than most. Sterling, Lorde's eleven year-old nephew, and Carmina, a Non (a human without a talent/power) who may never have talents, develop an interesting friendship that challenges the House of Gray. Sadie and Carmina also develop a relationship being the only two Non-talented humans at Strange Academy.

Woven through this story of challenging relationships is the mystery of Aunt Pippa's death which twists and turns with every clue that Sadie follows. It is an important element of the story and impacts Lorde Gray and Sadie's relationship in ways that will surprise you. Their dialogue is entertaining and believable. I loved taking this journey of self-discovery with them and found the book hard to put down until the wee hours of the morning.

Buy now from:    Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

The story contains adult language and sexual situations that some may find offensive. I found the sexual situations tastefully written and enjoyed them.

Added for Reprise Review: Strange Academy by Teresa Wilde was a nominee in the Paranormal Romance category for B&P 2014 Readers' Choice Awards. Original review ran November 28, 2013.

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues with editing or formatting.

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: ?wazithinkin

Approximate word count: 95-100,000 words